Graduation

VC Medal

*brushes dust off neglected blog*

That’s better. I’ve definitely not had much blogging-mojo in recent months. Perhaps this blog has served its purpose to some extent, although my hope is that I will still write the occasional post.  And here is one today! The title is, ‘Graduation’ although I suspect it may be a bit of a general reflective ramble.

When I started this blog it was the result of a conversation with my academic tutor about preparing myself for a career in research by having a space to regularly write and play about with ideas. It also was suggested that it could be a valuable place to explore the experience of being an occupational therapy student who had extensive experience of engagement with mental health services as a service-user. The idea was that the blog would be relatively anonymous and I could test the water of being a bit more open about my background, with the understanding that if it all went horribly wrong I would have a better understanding about the level of openness I could afford with colleagues. Fortunately it’s been a very positive experience and I’ve gained many connections, and even some wonderful friends, who knew me initially as ‘pd2ot’ before getting to know the ‘in real life’ me, with whom there has been an amazing level of acceptance. This has definitely translated into other situations as I tend to be much more open about my own history of mental health problems as I feel comfortable now about its value in my career as an occupational therapist/researcher, I also don’t worry about the anonymity any more (but I still like the ‘pd2ot’ name so hold onto it for that reason alone!).

This week I attended my graduation ceremony, following completion of my undergraduate degree in occupational therapy. The day was an amazing mix of nerves, excitement, happiness, sadness and pride. It prompted me to think about my starting point and the ‘journey’ I have been on (sorry, I hope this doesn’t come across as too ‘look at how far I have come, aren’t I amazing?’ as I hate that stuff, and equally I’m feeling reflective and want to validate the amount of effort I, and a huge number of supportive people, have put into me getting to this point). The other wonderful thing about the day was seeing so many of my cohort again, and beginning to understand just how much graduating meant to us all. It was a challenging three years and I don’t think anyone sailed through it untested, indeed many had massive hurdles to overcome along the way. I’d really love it if lots of people wrote down their ‘this is how I was at the start, and this is what I faced all the way through, and here I am now having learned x, y and z about myself’, but maybe I’m just nosey!

So yes, graduation! Well the picture above is the ‘Vice-Chancellor’s Medal for the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences’, which I won for my degree results. I was shocked when I found out, in fact I emailed a member of staff to check they’d got the right person… I guess I still lack a bit of self-belief! On a practical level I was a bit oblivious to the potential for there being prizes as the focus of my degree had never been about chasing marks. Due to previous experiences of university my only aim was to complete the degree in a good state of well-being. Of course, I always tried to produce work I was proud to hand in, but I actually has quite low expectations of the marks I needed to achieve. It was all about ‘just getting through’ and there were several points in the course where I questioned if it were possible. So yes, winning prizes wasn’t on the agenda! The other more tricky part to this is my past experience of being known for academic achievement. I have never had a good experience of getting good results in things. For this reason I decided that I would never discuss my marks with other people during this degree, and other than with very close, mostly non-uni, friends I kept that vow. So when I was told about the prizes I’d be receiving I realised that made it all a little more public! I can’t say being in the limelight for academic achievement felt at all comfortable, but it was manageable and nothing awful happened.

The part of the day that I’m probably most proud of though was being asked to give the ‘Student Vote of Thanks’. This involved reading a speech to a capacity-filled York Minster full of students, family, friends and academics. No pressure! I suspect anyone would have been a bit nervous, and I definitely was. However as I returned to my seat at the side of the stage after, I think, making a reasonable job of it I had one of those ‘Wow, I’m not sure anyone 5 years ago would have predicted that happening’. When I was part of a therapeutic community and beginning to engage in The Real World I had a real problem with being seen. When I left the therapeutic community I immediately commenced an Access to Higher Education Diploma and I remember that when faced with giving a presentation to one tutor with a video camera I really struggled. It took several weeks of my therapy time to discuss the issues around it and devise a plan of how to face it. I was incredibly uncertain of how I could continue into higher education and repeated experiences like that. So yes, four years later and there I was making a speech to, and definitely being seen by, over one thousand people. And in that moment, it felt OK to be me.

There are far too many changes to list here, but I think I feel content in the knowledge that completing my undergraduate occupational therapy degree has completely changed me. I feel so fortunate to have done it at a university that was the perfect mix of challenging and nurturing and I know that there were a lot of lecturers, tutors, friends, family and therapists who played their part in making sure I arrived at this point in one piece. (I have this image of lots of people around me ready with sticky tape to hold me together at the tough points and then some good quality furniture polish to give me a good clean up at the end… but hey, my brain is a little worn out at the minute!)

So to everyone who’s been there along the way (including all those on Twitter and here), thank you!

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2 thoughts on “Graduation

  1. Big congrats on graduating and the award. It must feel amazing- I know that when I graduate from my OT degree hopefully next year it’ll definitely feel like an acheivement because of all of took to get to that point.

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